Research on revolutionary combustion technology(2): Contemplating the limits of innovation

Toyota and Daimler introduce brand new engine series, Nissan's e-Power

2017/01/06

Summary

  OEMs are actively updating their powertrains in anticipation of 2050. Due to new European CO2 regulations that will come into effect in 2021, strengthened ZEV regulations in the U.S. starting in 2018, and the trends of CAFE standards, automakers are facing a situation that urgently requires a practical response.

  In December 2016, Toyota announced plans to introduce a new powertrain, as well as a newly designed 2.5L 4-cylinder gasoline engine called the Dynamic Force Engine that will replace the old AR engine. The engine will be equipped in the third round of TNGA platform models (following the Prius and C-HR) such as the Camry. The new engine is available in two varieties: one for HEVs and another for regular gasoline engines. The HEV version has a maximum thermal efficiency of 41% and output of 52 kW/L (71 ps/L), while the regular version has a maximum thermal efficiency of 40%, and an output of 60 kW/L (82 ps/L). Both versions have improved fuel economy and output characteristics in comparison to previous models. Toyota has also developed an eight-speed transmission for FF vehicles, and a ten-speed automatic transmission for FR vehicles. Although HEVs continues to use the THS-II system, a new transaxle and power control module have been developed. In the future, the OEM plans to release 19 models and 37 variations around the world by 2021.

  In May 2016, Daimler announced that it will invest EUR 3 billion (approximately JPY 345 billion) to develop and release a new gasoline and diesel engine series designed with a modular structure that will be available with 4-, 6-, or 8-cylinders.

  Nissan implemented its series hybrid system for the first time in the Note, improved the range and charge time for battery electric vehicles (BEVs), and topped domestic November sales for the first time in thirty years. This report will cover Toyota, which has announced it will transition to electrified cars for all its models by 2050, Daimler, which announced its transition to BEVs at the Paris Motor Show, and describe the powertrain updates planned by the three OEMs mentioned above.

Toyota's 2.5-liter Dynamic Force Engine
(Source: Toyota) Toyota's 2.5-liter Dynamic Force Engine
Daimler's new 2.0-liter gasoline engine
(Source: Daimler) Daimler's new 2.0-liter gasoline engine

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