Timing Chain

 Market share and supply status

Who Supplies Whom information by OEM region

 Region

 Maker

 Model

 Model year

 Supplier

 Products

ASEAN・India・Korea Daihatsu Granmax Cargo (Indonesia) 2021

Tsubakimoto Chain Co.

Timing chain
ASEAN・India・Korea Daihatsu Granmax Cargo (Indonesia) 2021

Tsubakimoto Chain Co.

Tensioner
ASEAN・India・Korea Daihatsu Granmax Cargo (Indonesia) 2021

Tsubakimoto Chain Co.

Lever and guide
Americas Honda Acura NSX (USA) 2021

U.S. Tsubaki Automotive, LLC - Chicopee Plant

Tensioner
Americas Honda Acura NSX (USA) 2021

U.S. Tsubaki Automotive, LLC - Chicopee Plant

Lever and guide
Americas Jeep Commander (Brazil)   2021

Litens Automotive do Brasil Ltda.

Belt tensioner
China Changan Ford Ford Focus NB (China) 2018

BorgWarner Automotive Components (Ningbo) Co., Ltd.

Timing chain
China Changan Mazda Mazda 3 Axela Hatchback (China) 2018

BorgWarner Automotive Components (Ningbo) Co., Ltd.

Timing chain
China Changan Mazda Mazda 3 Axela Sedan (China) 2018

BorgWarner Automotive Components (Ningbo) Co., Ltd.

Timing chain
Europe Audi A3 Sportback (Germany) 2021

Continental AG

Timing belt
Europe Audi A3 Sportback (Germany) 2021

Schaeffler AG

Belt tension pulley
Europe Bentley Flying Spur (UK) 2021

Schaeffler AG

Belt tension pulley
Japan Daihatsu Altis Hybrid 2021

Tsubakimoto Chain Co.

Timing chain
Japan Daihatsu Altis Hybrid 2021

Tsubakimoto Chain Co.

Tensioner
Japan Daihatsu Altis Hybrid 2021

Tsubakimoto Chain Co.

Lever and guide
 List of suppliers

Search Results 243results


Supplier Name Address Major Parts Suppliers Reports Country
BorgWarner Inc. 3850 Hamlin Rd, Auburn Hills, Michigan, 48326, USA Major Parts Suppliers image
Dayco Products LLC (Division of Mark IV Industries, Inc.) 1650 Research Drive Suite 200, Troy, MI 48083, USA Major Parts Suppliers image
Gates Corporation 1144 15th Street, Suite 1400, Denver, CO 80202, USA Major Parts Suppliers image
Hirschvogel Automotive Group (Hirschvogel Holding GmbH) Dr.-Manfred-Hirschvogel-Str. 6 86920 Denklingen, Germany Major Parts Suppliers image
Mitsuboshi Belting Ltd. 4-1-21 Hamazoe-dori, Nagata-ku, Kobe City, Hyogo Pref., 653-0024, Japan (Kobe Head Office) Major Parts Suppliers image
 News
Jul 02, 2021

On June 30, Porsche announced that it rounds off the Cayenne model with new Cayenne Turbo GT.
The new Cayenne Turbo GT delivers 471 kW (640 PS), fuel consumption combined 14.1 L/100 km (WLTP), CO2 emissions combined 319 g/km (WLTP) with four-liter biturbo V8. With 67 kW (90 PS) more than the Cayenne Turbo Coupé and maximum torque of 850 Nm (an increase of 80 Nm), the 0-100 km/h sprint is reduced to 3.3 seconds (0.6 s less) and top speed is now 300 km/h (an increase of 14 km/h). With even sportier lines and available exclusively as a four-seater Coupé, the Cayenne Turbo GT comes with all available chassis systems fitted as standard and performance tires developed specially for this model. The powertrain and chassis also have a unique set-up specifically tuned for the Cayenne Turbo GT.
The Cayenne Turbo GT’s biturbo engine is currently Porsche’s most powerful eight-cylinder unit.  The V8 of the Turbo GT differs from that of the Turbo Coupé in fundamental elements such as its crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons, timing chain drive and torsional vibration dampers. Given the increase in power to 471 kW, these components have been designed for higher peak loads and improved driving dynamics.
With the Turbo GT, the next-generation Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system is launched onto the market with improved performance, a new user interface and new operating logic in the Cayenne.

(Porsche press release on June 30, 2021)

Mar 18, 2021

On March 16, Honda Motor Co. said supply chain issues will force a halt to production at a majority of its U.S. and Canadian assembly plants for one week starting March 22.
A company spokesman said reasons for the closures stemmed from "the impact from COVID-19, congestion at various ports, the microchip shortage and severe winter weather over the past several weeks."
The production issues are hitting company plants in Ontario, Ohio, Alabama, and Indiana, though Honda said its Mexico operations have not yet announced any planned production cuts.
"In some way, all of our auto plants in the U.S. and Canada will be impacted," Honda said.
The company declined to specify the volume of vehicles impacted but said “purchasing and production teams are working to limit the impact of this situation.”
Some of the U.S. and Canadian plants are expected to have smaller production cuts next week, but the Honda spokesman noted that "the timing and length of production adjustments could change."
Meanwhile until next week, Honda workers reportedly will continue to work at the impacted plants, despite production issues.
(multiple sources on March 16, 2021)

Jan 19, 2021

2021 could not have come soon enough as we all looked to move past 2020 and the grip of a global pandemic. A new definition of disruption emerged last year with the spread of COVID-19 around the world, forcing significant challenges to society. And the automotive industry was no exception.

It is unlikely that 2020 will be remembered in a positive light, given the extent of the personal losses, financial stress and isolation faced by so many. But as the automotive industry, like so many others, found itself navigating uncharted waters, innovation and resilience began to surface from all the chaos.

Positive signals in 2020

  • The process of employees being redeployed at home, leaving offices suddenly deserted, was virtually – and perhaps surprisingly – seamless.
  • Vehicle manufacturing moved from various stages of shutdown in March and April back to assembly and new processes without any notable disruption, and vehicle inventory was rebuilt, despite the highly complex supply chain.
  • Those selling vehicles were forced to find new ways to complete purchases during periods of lockdown; dealers and buyers alike quickly adapted to virtual transactions, with test drives, deliveries and closings all shifting from showrooms to private homes.
  • Consumers’ willingness to continue to purchase vehicles was nothing short of astounding.
  • Industry events, including LMC Automotive’s, moved online and one could argue that the flow of information was better than ever.

As attention shifts to 2021 and beyond, some of these changes and innovations will endure, but the industry will, nevertheless, face significant challenges. The recovery trend in the global Light Vehicle market is forecast to continue from the better-than-expected performance in 2020, with global sales set to increase by 11% to nearly 87 million units in 2021, from 78 million units in 2020. Volumes are projected to return to pre-pandemic levels as early as 2022.

While there is reason for optimism, several unknowns will continue to impact the pace of recovery and a return to normality.

Uncertainties facing 2021

  • The level and amount of fiscal stimulus in various markets could skew how the global economy recovers.
  • The effectiveness of vaccines and the timing of rollouts present risks to ongoing improvement.
  • Changes emanating from a Biden administration are likely to impact the US economy, the pace of vehicle electrification in the US, as well as tariffs and global trade.
  • A Brexit deal is no longer an uncertainty, but the full impact on trade and vehicle sourcing in the UK is still an unknown.
  • Pent-up demand generated much of the 2020 recovery from April last year and will likely drive a degree of further growth in 2021 – and could even provide some upside potential if conditions are favourable.
  • As demand recovers, component shortages and other supply chain disruptions could still be a reality.


(LMC Automotive blog on January 7, 2021)