Hinge

 Market share and supply status

Who Supplies Whom information by OEM region

 Region

 Maker

 Model

 Model year

 Supplier

 Products

ASEAN・India・Korea Ford Everest (Thailand) 2021

AAPICO Hitech Public Co., Ltd.

Door check
ASEAN・India・Korea Ford Ranger (Thailand) 2021

AAPICO Hitech Public Co., Ltd.

Door check
ASEAN・India・Korea Ford Ranger (Thailand) 2021

AAPICO Hitech Public Co., Ltd.

Door check link
Americas Daimler Mercedes-Benz GLS (USA) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Hood hinge
Americas Ford Bronco Sport (Mexico) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Door hinge
Americas Ford Bronco Sport (Mexico) 2021

Multimatic, Inc.

Door check
China BMW Brilliance BMW iX3 (China) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Door hinge
China BMW Brilliance BMW iX3 (China) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Door check
China BMW Brilliance BMW iX3 (China) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Tailgate hinge
Europe Aston Martin DBX (UK) 2021

Stabilus GmbH

Hood gas spring
Europe Audi A3 Sedan (Germany) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Door hinge
Europe Audi A3 Sportback (Germany) 2021

Edscha Holding GmbH

Door hinge
Japan Daihatsu Mebius 2021

Pacific Industrial Co., Ltd.

Hood hinge
Japan Toyota Allion 2021

Pacific Industrial Co., Ltd.

Hood hinge
Japan Toyota Alphard 2021

Pacific Industrial Co., Ltd.

Hood hinge
 List of suppliers

Search Results 411results


Supplier Name Address Major Parts Suppliers Reports Country
AAPICO Hitech Public Co., Ltd. 99 Moo 1, Hitech Industrial Estate, Tambol Ban Lane, Amphur Bangpa-in, Ayutthaya 13160, Thailand Major Parts Suppliers image
Aisin Corporation (Formerly Aisin Seiki Co., Ltd.) 2-1 Asahi-machi, Kariya, Aichi 448-8650, Japan Major Parts Suppliers image
Aisin Seiki (China) Investment Co., Ltd. 1202-1205, TEDA MSD-C3 Bldg, No.79 First Avenue, TEDA, Tianjin 300457, China Major Parts Suppliers image
Brano Group, a.s. Opavska 1000 - 747 41 Hradec nad Moravici, Czech Republic Major Parts Suppliers image
Edscha Holding GmbH Hohenhagener Strasse 26-28, 42855 Remscheid, Germany Major Parts Suppliers image
 News
Sep 22, 2021

Early optimism by European automakers and analysts alike, with claims that vehicle output would improve markedly in the second half of 2021, has long since faded as the procurement crisis persists. The most recent setback has been the forced closure of semiconductor facilities in Malaysia to contain the latest coronavirus outbreak. The crisis hinges upon raw material price increases, semiconductor shortages and bottlenecks in the production of intermediate products. Undeniably, the major constraint to European Light Vehicle output so far this year has been the scarcity of chips, which is estimated to account for roughly 80% of the total loss in output from our pre-crisis expectations. Meanwhile, shortages of other vehicle components, such as wiring harnesses and brake parts, have further exacerbated the slowdown, albeit to a lesser extent.

Through to the end of Q3 this year, we estimate that almost 1.5 million fewer vehicles were produced in Europe as a result of chip supply disruptions. These losses are substantial, so much so that vehicle inventories are running too low to adequately supply buoyant demand for new cars. The inverse is usually true, with demand dictating the level of supply. Despite this, and perhaps counterintuitively, OEMs have managed to improve profitability over the first half of 2021 (see chart below for H1 CY net profit figures) by prioritising high-margin models and raising vehicle prices to offset higher input costs. In essence, the procurement crisis has increasingly steered market power away from consumers. In addition, manufacturers have continued the cost-reduction work started before the pandemic, including both capacity and model line-up rationalisation.

Nonetheless, the situation remains suboptimal, with potential sales forgone as higher vehicle prices force some buyers out of the new car market. This is evidenced by the dramatic increase in second-hand car prices. Moreover, it is arguably no coincidence that Hyundai’s and Toyota’s management of the crisis, despite recently announced disruptions, has helped to support their respective global output levels (see chart below) and leave them well placed to gain market share and post healthy profits. The clear implication of this is that, if it were possible, manufacturers would supply more vehicles, thus reverting to a perfectly competitive market and lowering the price of new cars for consumers.

Unfortunately, supply constraints and inflationary pressures will almost certainly persist until the chip shortage is resolved, which will require greater chip allocation to the automotive industry. The cost and complex nature of semiconductor manufacturing means that it takes years for production capacity to expand. We therefore expect disruptions to European Light Vehicle production to continue until at least 2023, at which point output volumes are set to just about recover to 2019 (pre-pandemic) levels.


Source: LMC Automotive European Light Vehicle Production Forecast    Note: (R) = Renault

(LMC Automotive blog on September 17, 2021)

Sep 07, 2021

On September 5, smart Automobile Co., Ltd., revealed its first series-production model of the new smart generation, Concept #1 at IAA 2021 in Munich. The smart Concept #1 transfers very compact exterior dimensions and the traditional smart design into a new vehicle concept with a significantly higher premium and high-tech claim.
The near-production smart Concept #1 has length 4,290 mm, width 1,910 mm and height of 1,698 mm with wheelbase 2,750 mm.
It has got a center console, which floats between the front seats and merges seamlessly with the unique dashboard design. The central control element is the free-standing 3D touchscreen with a 12.8-inch display.
With dynamic OTA software updates, more than 75% of all ECU that controls infotainment, driver assistance systems, electromobility-specific functions and the electric/electronic vehicle architecture, can be updated remotely on an ongoing basis.
The Concept #1 has got a large panoramic glass roof with a striking ring of light.
The rear doors of the model are hinged at the back and open in the opposite direction from the front doors. The absence of a B-pillar gives an unobstructed view of the generously dimensioned interior when the doors are open.
The LED head- and taillight enhance the exterior of the Concept #1. Starting from the illuminated radiator grille, light effects also move in time to the music along the sides of the vehicle to the rear diffuser.


(smart Automobile Co., Ltd. Press release)

Jun 25, 2021

On June 23, Honda revealed the 2022 Civic Hatchback, the latest addition to the all-new 11th-generation Civic lineup.
The Civic Hatchback will be built in the U.S. for the first time, with production to begin later in 2021 at Honda's Greensburg, Indiana auto plant.
Building on the 2022 Civic Sedan that arrived in Honda dealerships earlier this month, the Civic Hatchback combines five-door versatility with ride and handling developed in Europe and an upgraded 6-speed manual transmission available in Sport and Sport Touring grades.
LX and Sport grades feature a naturally aspirated 2.0-liter 4-cylinder, producing 158 hp and 138 lb-ft of torque, while EX-L and Sport Touring trims feature a turbocharged 1.5-liter 4-cylinder producing 180 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque.
Equipped similar to the 2022 Civic Sedan, the Civic Hatchback features a new standard single-camera Honda Sensing suite of safety and driver-assistive technologies.
Reintroduced to the U.S. market with the 10th-generation Civic in 2016, Civic Hatchback has grown to account for more than 20% of all Civic sales.
Compared to the 10th-generation Civic Hatchback, its windshield pillars have been moved rearward 1.96 inches, its wheelbase is 1.4-inches longer improving rear legroom by as much, and rear headroom has been preserved with a new hinge design for the new composite hatch.
The Hatchback's rear overhang and overall length are 4.9-inches shorter than the Civic Sedan's.

(Honda press release on June 23, 2021)